Luis Valdez

Fall 2016

The James D. Houston Memorial Lecture

Join us in the newly refurbished Hammer Theatre for a gala evening celebrating the CLA’s 30 years of bringing top authors to San José. Our featured speaker will be none other than acclaimed author, playwright, actor, and director, Luis Valdez. A San José State alumnus, Valdez founded the theatre El Teatro Campesino in 1965 on the Delano Grape Strike picket lines of Cesar Chavez’s United Farmworkers Union to dramatize the plight and cause of farmworkers. El Teatro Campesino was honored with an Obie Award for “demonstrating the politics of survival.” In 1979, Valdez’s play Zoot Suit became the first Chicano work to debut on Broadway. His self-directed movie, La Bamba, was nominated for the 1988 Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture in the Drama category. Valdez has won the Hispanic Heritage award in Literature, as well as the Presidential Medal of the Arts. He has also won three Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards and an Emmy Award.  Meet Luis at a private VIP reception and CLA fundraiser following the show.

Co-sponsored by MACLA.

October 19, 7pm – Lecture, Hammer Theatre
October 19, 8pm – CLA Fundraiser and Reception, Hammer Theatre

 

 

 

 

Ticketing Information:

Unless otherwise stated, events are free. However, tickets are required to attend the lecture at the Hammer Theatre. Click on the button below and select how many tickets you would like.

Reception

Please join us for a VIP reception with Mr. Valdez following his lecture. This will be held at the Hammer Theatre, beginning at 8:15pm. Tickets cost $30.

CLA button

img_3255

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRAISE FOR LUIS VALDEZ

“We need memory plays as powerful as [Valley of the Heart], in venues up and down the state. Too many people have forgotten, or never knew, that tens of thousands of Americans were rounded up, interrogated and sent to camps for no crime other than their Japanese ancestry. In an era of secret terrorism courts, widespread government surveillance and Minuteman patrols, we need to be confronted with the realities of 1942 — the acts of bravery, the gestures of kindness, the humanity as well as the tragedy.”
— Los Angeles Times

“Valdez is the Pachuco of Broadway,… the brilliant student who will change the face of Hollywood portrayals of his people.”
—Jorge Huerta

All events are open to the public and wheelchair accessible.